Publications

Research Database Profiles:

In Press

  • M. Quayle and M. Adshead, “The resilience of regional african hiv/aids research networks to the withdrawal of international authors in the subfield of public administration and governance: lessons for funders and collaborators,” Scientometrics, In Press. doi:10.1007/s11192-018-2863-y
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Article{Quayle2018,
    author = {Michael Quayle and Maura Adshead},
    title = {The resilience of regional African HIV/AIDS research networks to the withdrawal of international authors in the subfield of public administration and governance: lessons for funders and collaborators},
    journal = {Scientometrics},
    year = {In Press},
    doi = {10.1007/s11192-018-2863-y},
    owner = {MQ},
    timestamp = {2018-07-27},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Quayle2018_MS_Resilience_of_African_Author_NW.v5_final_prepub.pdf},
    }

2018

  • M. Quayle, G. Lindegger, K. Brittain, N. Nabee, and C. Cole, “Women’s ideals for masculinity across social contexts: patriarchal agentic masculinity is valued in work, family, and romance but communal masculinity in friendship,” Sex roles, pp. 1-15, 2018. doi:10.1007/s11199-017-0772-9
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The present study explores women’s ideals for masculinity in different social contexts (work, family/romance, and friendship) and compares how traditional (agentic) and non-patriarchal (communal) masculinity are valued in each context. Survey data were collected from one international (N = 159) and three South African samples (Ns = 86, 100, 161) of women. Results show that although women value patriarchal ideals for masculinity, agentic and communal versions of masculinity are valued differently across contexts. Specifically, traditional agentic versions of masculinity were most valued in the contexts most important to the long-term production of viable identity (family/romance and work). It was only in friendship that non-patriarchal communal masculinity was consistently idealized over traditional agentic masculinity. The results are discussed in relation to hegemonic masculinity (HM) and system justification theory (SJT). Congruent with SJT, women idealized versions of masculinity that may not be in their own or their group’s best interests, but in line with HM, the results emphasized the fluidity of masculinity and that the same individual can simultaneously idealize different versions of masculinity depending on the context. Because stereotypes are both explanations for the status quo and warrants for behaving in one way or another, these collective ideals for masculinity and contextual boundaries may be important obstacles to achieving gender equity.

    @Article{Quayle2018_WomensIdealsMasculinity,
    author = {Quayle, Michael and Lindegger, Graham and Brittain, Kirsty and Nabee, Neesa and Cole, Charlene},
    title = {Women's Ideals for Masculinity Across Social Contexts: Patriarchal Agentic Masculinity is Valued in Work, Family, and Romance but Communal Masculinity in Friendship},
    journal = {Sex Roles},
    year = {2018},
    pages = {1--15},
    issn = {1573-2762},
    abstract = {The present study explores women's ideals for masculinity in different social contexts (work, family/romance, and friendship) and compares how traditional (agentic) and non-patriarchal (communal) masculinity are valued in each context. Survey data were collected from one international (N = 159) and three South African samples (Ns = 86, 100, 161) of women. Results show that although women value patriarchal ideals for masculinity, agentic and communal versions of masculinity are valued differently across contexts. Specifically, traditional agentic versions of masculinity were most valued in the contexts most important to the long-term production of viable identity (family/romance and work). It was only in friendship that non-patriarchal communal masculinity was consistently idealized over traditional agentic masculinity. The results are discussed in relation to hegemonic masculinity (HM) and system justification theory (SJT). Congruent with SJT, women idealized versions of masculinity that may not be in their own or their group's best interests, but in line with HM, the results emphasized the fluidity of masculinity and that the same individual can simultaneously idealize different versions of masculinity depending on the context. Because stereotypes are both explanations for the status quo and warrants for behaving in one way or another, these collective ideals for masculinity and contextual boundaries may be important obstacles to achieving gender equity.},
    doi = {10.1007/s11199-017-0772-9},
    file = {:Quayle2018_WomensIdealsMasculinity.pdf:PDF;:Quayle2018_WomensIdealsMasculinity.pdf:PDF;:Quayle2018_WomensIdealsMasculinity-prepub_final.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    timestamp = {2017.05.09},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Quayle2018_WomensIdealsMasculinity-prepub_final.pdf},
    }

  • J. Firnhaber, R. Greenwood, and M. Quayle, “Continuity in the face of change: identifying three strategies for constructing stable masculinity in liminality,” British Journal of Social Psychology, 2018. doi:10.1111/bjso.12274
    [BibTeX]
    @Article{Firnhaber2018,
    author = {Joseph Firnhaber and Ronni Greenwood and Michael Quayle},
    title = {Continuity in the face of change: Identifying three strategies for constructing stable masculinity in liminality},
    journal = {{B}ritish {J}ournal of {S}ocial {P}sychology},
    year = {2018},
    doi = {10.1111/bjso.12274},
    owner = {MQ},
    timestamp = {2018-07-31},
    }

2017

  • A. Nightingale, M. Quayle, and O. Muldoon, “"it’s just heart breaking": doing inclusive political solidarity or ambivalent paternalism through sympathetic discourse within the "refugee crisis" debate,” Journal of community & applied social psychology, 2017. doi:10.1002/casp.2303
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Article{Nightingale_2017,
    author = {Alastair Nightingale and Michael Quayle and Orla Muldoon},
    title = {"It's just heart breaking": Doing inclusive political solidarity or ambivalent paternalism through sympathetic discourse within the "refugee crisis" debate},
    journal = {Journal of Community {\&} Applied Social Psychology},
    year = {2017},
    doi = {10.1002/casp.2303},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    publisher = {Wiley-Blackwell},
    timestamp = {2017.02.21},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Nightingale_etal_2017.pdf},
    }

  • M. Quayle, A. Wurm, H. Barnes, T. Barr, E. Beal, M. Fallon, R. Flynn, D. McGrath, R. McKenna, D. Mernagh, M. Pilch, E. Ryan, P. Wall, S. Walsh, and R. Wei, “Stereotyping by omission and commission: creating distinctive gendered spectacles in the televised coverage of the 2015 australian open men’s and women’s tennis singles semi-finals and finals,” International review for the sociology of sport, p. 1012690217701889, 2017. doi:10.1177/1012690217701889
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This paper explores the way in which announcers created spectacle in the Eurosport coverage of the men?s and women?s tennis singles semi-finals and finals at the Australian Open 2015. This was an event where gender representations were under global social media scrutiny after two female players were asked to ?twirl? for the audience. We used a two-phase thematic analysis. Semantic thematic analysis showed that more personal descriptions were directed at women than men and these often described off-court features. Descriptions of men included detailed and specific portrayals of physical characteristics, while women?s bodies were seldom referred to specifically. Discourse analysis showed that men?s games were spoken of as physical clashes between titans. In contrast, women?s matches were described in aesthetic rather than physical terms and ?diva-like? personalities and relationships were important features of women?s game narratives. While male bodies were described in specific detail where relevant to technical features of the game, women?s bodies were only described indirectly and non-specifically. For the women?s game, this dialogical repression of specific body talk in combination with a strong focus on aesthetic judgements invoked stereotypes by omission, simultaneously reinscribing gender stereotypes and emphasizing their importance by communicating taboo. These gendered commentaries created distinctive gendered spectacles for the men?s and women?s events. This paper explores the way in which announcers created spectacle in the Eurosport coverage of the men?s and women?s tennis singles semi-finals and finals at the Australian Open 2015. This was an event where gender representations were under global social media scrutiny after two female players were asked to ?twirl? for the audience. We used a two-phase thematic analysis. Semantic thematic analysis showed that more personal descriptions were directed at women than men and these often described off-court features. Descriptions of men included detailed and specific portrayals of physical characteristics, while women?s bodies were seldom referred to specifically. Discourse analysis showed that men?s games were spoken of as physical clashes between titans. In contrast, women?s matches were described in aesthetic rather than physical terms and ?diva-like? personalities and relationships were important features of women?s game narratives. While male bodies were described in specific detail where relevant to technical features of the game, women?s bodies were only described indirectly and non-specifically. For the women?s game, this dialogical repression of specific body talk in combination with a strong focus on aesthetic judgements invoked stereotypes by omission, simultaneously reinscribing gender stereotypes and emphasizing their importance by communicating taboo. These gendered commentaries created distinctive gendered spectacles for the men?s and women?s events.

    @Article{Quayle2017,
    author = {Quayle, Michael and Wurm, Alanna and Barnes, Hayley and Barr, Thomas and Beal, Erin and Fallon, Mairead and Flynn, Rachel and McGrath, Dearan and McKenna, Roseanne and Mernagh, Dylan and Pilch, Monika and Ryan, Emma and Wall, Peter and Walsh, Sarah and Wei, Ran},
    title = {Stereotyping by omission and commission: Creating distinctive gendered spectacles in the televised coverage of the 2015 Australian Open men's and women's tennis singles semi-finals and finals},
    journal = {International Review for the Sociology of Sport},
    year = {2017},
    pages = {1012690217701889},
    month = mar,
    issn = {1012-6902},
    __markedentry = {[Mike.quayle:6]},
    abstract = {This paper explores the way in which announcers created spectacle in the Eurosport coverage of the men?s and women?s tennis singles semi-finals and finals at the Australian Open 2015. This was an event where gender representations were under global social media scrutiny after two female players were asked to ?twirl? for the audience. We used a two-phase thematic analysis. Semantic thematic analysis showed that more personal descriptions were directed at women than men and these often described off-court features. Descriptions of men included detailed and specific portrayals of physical characteristics, while women?s bodies were seldom referred to specifically. Discourse analysis showed that men?s games were spoken of as physical clashes between titans. In contrast, women?s matches were described in aesthetic rather than physical terms and ?diva-like? personalities and relationships were important features of women?s game narratives. While male bodies were described in specific detail where relevant to technical features of the game, women?s bodies were only described indirectly and non-specifically. For the women?s game, this dialogical repression of specific body talk in combination with a strong focus on aesthetic judgements invoked stereotypes by omission, simultaneously reinscribing gender stereotypes and emphasizing their importance by communicating taboo. These gendered commentaries created distinctive gendered spectacles for the men?s and women?s events.
    This paper explores the way in which announcers created spectacle in the Eurosport coverage of the men?s and women?s tennis singles semi-finals and finals at the Australian Open 2015. This was an event where gender representations were under global social media scrutiny after two female players were asked to ?twirl? for the audience. We used a two-phase thematic analysis. Semantic thematic analysis showed that more personal descriptions were directed at women than men and these often described off-court features. Descriptions of men included detailed and specific portrayals of physical characteristics, while women?s bodies were seldom referred to specifically. Discourse analysis showed that men?s games were spoken of as physical clashes between titans. In contrast, women?s matches were described in aesthetic rather than physical terms and ?diva-like? personalities and relationships were important features of women?s game narratives. While male bodies were described in specific detail where relevant to technical features of the game, women?s bodies were only described indirectly and non-specifically. For the women?s game, this dialogical repression of specific body talk in combination with a strong focus on aesthetic judgements invoked stereotypes by omission, simultaneously reinscribing gender stereotypes and emphasizing their importance by communicating taboo. These gendered commentaries created distinctive gendered spectacles for the men?s and women?s events.},
    comment = {doi: 10.1177/1012690217701889},
    doi = {10.1177/1012690217701889},
    file = {Quayle2017_AusOpen.pdf:Quayle2017_AusOpen.pdf:PDF;Quayle2017_et_al_InternationalReviewSociologySport_CopyrightAgreement.txt:Quayle2017_et_al_InternationalReviewSociologySport_CopyrightAgreement.txt:Text;Quayle2017_InternationalReviewSociologySport Copyright Agreement.pdf:Quayle2017_InternationalReviewSociologySport Copyright Agreement.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    publisher = {SAGE Publications},
    timestamp = {2017.04.26},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Quayle2017_etal_AusOpen_prepub_final.pdf},
    }

  • D. L. Marais, M. Quayle, and J. K. Burns, “The role of access to information in enabling transparency and public participation in governance – a case study of access to policy consultation records in south africa,” African journal of public affairs, vol. 9, iss. 6, pp. 36-49, 2017.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The operationalisation of good governance principles such as transparency and public participation depends largely on the degree of access that citizens have to government information. This article is based on the notion that citizens should be informed about what government is or does (transparency) and provided with sufficient opportunities to influence this (public participation). Both of these depend on the provision of reliable information before, during and after policy consultation. The article explores how transparency may be operationalised through access to information and how this is implemented in South Africa through the Promotion of Access to Information Act. It then focuses on policy consultation as a mechanism for government transparency that can only function adequately if the public has access to information concerning both the policy and the consultation process. This case study documents is an attempt to obtain records concerning public consultation on mental health policy from a number of South African government departments. Findings suggest that access to information is variably applied across national and provincial Departments of Health, and that legislation regarding the transparency of policy consultations appears contradictory. Based on these experiences, we reflect on potential tensions between the accountability and transparency functions of access to information and public participation in policy making (vis-à-vis policy consultation), and how these tensions can obstruct public participation. We recommend that guidelines be established regarding systemic procedures for taking and keeping records on public consultations.

    @Article{Marais2017,
    author = {Marais, D.L. and Quayle, M. and Burns, J.K.},
    title = {The role of access to information in enabling transparency and public participation in governance - a case study of access to policy consultation records in South Africa},
    journal = {African Journal of Public Affairs},
    year = {2017},
    volume = {9},
    number = {6},
    pages = {36-49},
    issn = {1997-7441},
    abstract = {The operationalisation of good governance principles such as transparency and public participation depends largely on the degree of access that citizens have to government information. This article is based on the notion that citizens should be informed about what government is or does (transparency) and provided with sufficient opportunities to influence this (public participation). Both of these depend on the provision of reliable information before, during and after policy consultation. The article explores how transparency may be operationalised through access to information and how this is implemented in South Africa through the Promotion of Access to Information Act. It then focuses on policy consultation as a mechanism for government transparency that can only function adequately if the public has access to information concerning both the policy and the consultation process. This case study documents is an attempt to obtain records concerning public consultation on mental health policy from a number of South African government departments. Findings suggest that access to information is variably applied across national and provincial Departments of Health, and that legislation regarding the transparency of policy consultations appears contradictory. Based on these experiences, we reflect on potential tensions between the accountability and transparency functions of access to information and public participation in policy making (vis-à-vis policy consultation), and how these tensions can obstruct public participation. We recommend that guidelines be established regarding systemic procedures for taking and keeping records on public consultations.},
    file = {:Marais2017 - The role of access to information in enabling transparency and public participation in governance - a case study of access to policy consultation records in South Africa.pdf:PDF},
    language = {English},
    owner = {MQ},
    publisher = {African Consortium of Public Administration (ACPA)},
    timestamp = {2017-06-19},
    type = {Journal Article},
    url = {https://journals.co.za/content/journal/10520/EJC-754deef6f},
    }

2016

  • K. Durrheim, M. Quayle, and J. Dixon, “The struggle for the nature of ‘prejudice’: ‘prejudice’ expression as identity performance,” Political psychology, vol. 37, iss. 1, pp. 17-35, 2016. doi:10.1111/pops.12310
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article develops an identity performance model of prejudice that highlights the creative influence of prejudice expressions on norms and situations. Definitions of prejudice can promote social change or stability when they are used to achieve social identification, explanation, and mobilization. Tacit or explicit agreement about the nature of prejudice is accomplished collaboratively by persuading others to accept (1) an abstract definition of ‘prejudice’, (2) concrete exemplars of ‘prejudicem’ and (3) associated beliefs about how a target group should be treated. This article reviews three ways in which ‘prejudice’ can be defined in the cut and thrust of social interaction, namely, by mobilizing hatred and violence, by accusation and denial, and by repression. The struggle for the nature of prejudice determines who can be badly treated and by whom. Studying such ordinary struggles to define what counts (and does not count) as ‘prejudice’ will allow us to understand how identities are produced, norms are set into motion, and populations are mobilized as social relations are reformulated.

    @Article{Durrheim2016,
    author = {Durrheim, Kevin and Quayle, Mike and Dixon, John},
    title = {The Struggle for the Nature of 'Prejudice': 'Prejudice' Expression as Identity Performance},
    journal = {Political Psychology},
    year = {2016},
    volume = {37},
    number = {1},
    pages = {17--35},
    month = feb,
    issn = {1467-9221},
    abstract = {This article develops an identity performance model of prejudice that
    highlights the creative influence of prejudice expressions on norms
    and situations. Definitions of prejudice can promote social change
    or stability when they are used to achieve social identification,
    explanation, and mobilization. Tacit or explicit agreement about
    the nature of prejudice is accomplished collaboratively by persuading
    others to accept (1) an abstract definition of 'prejudice', (2) concrete
    exemplars of 'prejudicem' and (3) associated beliefs about how a
    target group should be treated. This article reviews three ways in
    which 'prejudice' can be defined in the cut and thrust of social
    interaction, namely, by mobilizing hatred and violence, by accusation
    and denial, and by repression. The struggle for the nature of prejudice
    determines who can be badly treated and by whom. Studying such ordinary
    struggles to define what counts (and does not count) as 'prejudice'
    will allow us to understand how identities are produced, norms are
    set into motion, and populations are mobilized as social relations
    are reformulated.},
    doi = {10.1111/pops.12310},
    file = {Durrheim2016.pdf:Durrheim2016.pdf:PDF;Durrheim2016_etal_prejudice_as identity_performance_preprint_final.pdf:Durrheim2016_etal_prejudice_as identity_performance_preprint_final.pdf:PDF},
    keywords = {prejudice, identity performance, discourse, denial, social identity theory},
    owner = {psycho},
    timestamp = {2016.03.11},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Durrheim2016_etal_prejudice_as%20identity_performance_preprint_final.pdf},
    }

  • K. Durrheim, M. Quayle, C. G. Tredoux, K. Titlestad, and L. Tooke, “Investigating the evolution of ingroup favoritism using a minimal group interaction paradigm: the effects of inter- and intragroup interdependence,” PLOS ONE, vol. 11, iss. 11, p. e0165974, 2016. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0165974
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Article{Durrheim2016a,
    author = {Kevin Durrheim and Michael Quayle and Colin G. Tredoux and Kim Titlestad and Larry Tooke},
    title = {Investigating the Evolution of Ingroup Favoritism Using a Minimal Group Interaction Paradigm: The Effects of Inter- and Intragroup Interdependence},
    journal = {{PLOS} {ONE}},
    year = {2016},
    volume = {11},
    number = {11},
    pages = {e0165974},
    month = {nov},
    doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0165974},
    editor = {Long Wang},
    file = {:Durrheim2016.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    publisher = {Public Library of Science ({PLoS})},
    timestamp = {2016.12.05},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0165974},
    }

2015

  • J. Dixon, K. Durrheim, M. Thomae, C. Tredoux, P. Kerr, and M. Quayle, “Divide and rule, unite and resist: contact, collective action and policy attitudes among historically disadvantaged groups,” Journal of social issues, vol. 71, iss. 3, pp. 576-596, 2015.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Racial segregation encourages members of historically advantaged groups to form negative intergroup attitudes, which then motivate practices of discrimination that sustain inequality and disadvantage. By implication, interventions designed to increase intergroup contact have been proposed as a means of reducing dominant group prejudices and promoting social change. In this article, we highlight another mechanism through which segregation shapes intergroup relations, namely, by inhibiting political solidarity between historically disadvantaged groups. Building on a field survey conducted in postapartheid South Africa, we demonstrate how challenging this form of segregation may reveal alternative mechanisms through which intergroup contact facilitates social change. Notably, we report evidence that positive contact with Black residents of an informal settlement in Pietermaritzburg was associated with Indian residents’ support for political policies and forms of collective action that might improve conditions in that settlement. In addition, we show that such support was partly mediated by perceptions of collective discrimination.

    @Article{Dixon2015Divide_and_Rule-Journal_of_Social_Issues,
    author = {Dixon, John and Durrheim, Kevin and Thomae, Manuela and Tredoux, Colin and Kerr, Philippa and Quayle, Michael},
    title = {Divide and Rule, Unite and Resist: Contact, Collective Action and Policy Attitudes among Historically Disadvantaged Groups},
    journal = {Journal of Social Issues},
    year = {2015},
    volume = {71},
    number = {3},
    pages = {576--596},
    month = sep,
    issn = {1540-4560},
    abstract = {Racial segregation encourages members of historically advantaged groups
    to form negative intergroup attitudes, which then motivate practices
    of discrimination that sustain inequality and disadvantage. By implication,
    interventions designed to increase intergroup contact have been proposed
    as a means of reducing dominant group prejudices and promoting social
    change. In this article, we highlight another mechanism through which
    segregation shapes intergroup relations, namely, by inhibiting political
    solidarity between historically disadvantaged groups. Building on
    a field survey conducted in postapartheid South Africa, we demonstrate
    how challenging this form of segregation may reveal alternative mechanisms
    through which intergroup contact facilitates social change. Notably,
    we report evidence that positive contact with Black residents of
    an informal settlement in Pietermaritzburg was associated with Indian
    residents’ support for political policies and forms of collective
    action that might improve conditions in that settlement. In addition,
    we show that such support was partly mediated by perceptions of collective
    discrimination.},
    file = {Dixon2015Divide_and_Rule-Journal_of_Social_Issues_Published.pdf:Dixon2015Divide_and_Rule-Journal_of_Social_Issues_Published.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    timestamp = {2015.10.01},
    url = {http://www.academia.edu/download/45961981/Dixonetal2015JSI.pdf},
    }

  • R. Jewkes, R. Morrell, J. Hearn, E. Lundqvist, D. Blackbeard, G. Lindegger, M. Quayle, Y. Sikweyiya, and L. Gottzén, “Hegemonic masculinity: combining theory and practice in gender interventions,” Culture, health & sexuality, vol. 17, iss. sup2, pp. 96-111, 2015. doi:10.1080/13691058.2015.1085094
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Article{Jewkes2015,
    author = {Rachel Jewkes and Robert Morrell and Jeff Hearn and Emma Lundqvist and David Blackbeard and Graham Lindegger and Michael Quayle and Yandisa Sikweyiya and Lucas Gottzén},
    title = {Hegemonic masculinity: combining theory and practice in gender interventions},
    journal = {Culture, Health \& Sexuality},
    year = {2015},
    volume = {17},
    number = {sup2},
    pages = {96-111},
    doi = {10.1080/13691058.2015.1085094},
    eprint = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2015.1085094},
    file = {Jewkes2015.pdf:Jewkes2015.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    timestamp = {2015.11.20},
    url = {http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.790.152&rep=rep1&type=pdf},
    }

  • M. Quayle, K. Durrheim, and L. Tooke, The virtual interaction application (viappl): software for running experiments with interaction and social networks, 2015.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Misc{Quayle2015,
    author = {Quayle, M and Durrheim, K. and Tooke, L.},
    title = {The Virtual Interaction APPlication (VIAPPL): Software for running experiments with interaction and social networks},
    year = {2015},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    timestamp = {2016.12.05},
    url = {http://www.viappl.org},
    }

2014

  • R. Moorhouse, C. Slack, M. Quayle, Z. Essack, and G. Lindegger, “Stakeholder views of ethical guidance regarding prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials,” BMC medical ethics, vol. 15, iss. 51, 2014. doi:10.1186/1472-6939-15-51
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    BACKGROUND:South Africa is a major hub of HIV prevention trials, with plans for a licensure trial to start in 2015. The appropriate standards of care and of prevention in HIV vaccine trials are complex and debated issues and ethical guidelines offer some direction. However, there has been limited empirical exploration of South African stakeholders’ perspectives on ethical guidance related to prevention and care in HIV vaccine trials.METHODS:Site staff, Community Advisory Board members and Research Ethics Committee members involved with current HIV vaccine trials in South Africa were invited to participate in an exploration of their views. A questionnaire listed 10 care and 10 prevention recommendations drawn from two widely available sets of ethical guidelines for biomedical HIV prevention trials. Respondents (n=98) rated each recommendation on five dimensions: "Familiarity with", "Ease of Understanding", "Ease of Implementing", "Perceived Protection", and "Agreement with" each ethical recommendation. The ratings were used to describe stakeholder perspectives on dimensions for each recommendation. Dimension ratings were averaged across the five dimensions and used as an indication of overall merit for each recommendation. Differences were explored across dimensions, between care-oriented and prevention-oriented recommendations, and between stakeholder groups.RESULTS:Both care and prevention recommendations were rated highly overall, with median ratings well above the scale midpoint. In general, informed consent recommendations were most positively rated. Care-related recommendations were rated significantly more positively than prevention-related recommendations, with the five lowest-rated recommendations being prevention-related. The most problematic dimension across all recommendations was "Ease of Implementing," and the least problematic was "Agreement with," suggesting the most pressing stakeholder concerns are practical rather than theoretical; that is, respondents agree with but see barriers to the attainment of these recommendations.CONCLUSIONS:We propose that prevention recommendations be prioritized for refinement, especially those assigned bottom-ranking scores for "Ease of Implementing", and/ or "Ease of Understanding" in order to assist vaccine stakeholders to better comprehend and implement these recommendations. Further qualitative research could also assist to better understand nuances in stakeholder reservations about implementing such recommendations.

    @Article{Moorhouse2014,
    author = {Moorhouse, Rika and Slack, Catherine and Quayle, Michael and Essack, Zaynab and Lindegger, Graham},
    title = {Stakeholder views of ethical guidance regarding prevention and care in {HIV} vaccine trials},
    journal = {{BMC} Medical Ethics},
    year = {2014},
    volume = {15},
    number = {51},
    issn = {1472-6939},
    note = {Open Access.},
    abstract = {BACKGROUND:South Africa is a major hub of HIV prevention trials, with
    plans for a licensure trial to start in 2015. The appropriate standards
    of care and of prevention in HIV vaccine trials are complex and debated
    issues and ethical guidelines offer some direction. However, there
    has been limited empirical exploration of South African stakeholders'
    perspectives on ethical guidance related to prevention and care in
    HIV vaccine trials.METHODS:Site staff, Community Advisory Board members
    and Research Ethics Committee members involved with current HIV vaccine
    trials in South Africa were invited to participate in an exploration
    of their views. A questionnaire listed 10 care and 10 prevention
    recommendations drawn from two widely available sets of ethical guidelines
    for biomedical HIV prevention trials. Respondents (n=98) rated each
    recommendation on five dimensions: "Familiarity with", "Ease of Understanding",
    "Ease of Implementing", "Perceived Protection", and "Agreement with"
    each ethical recommendation. The ratings were used to describe stakeholder
    perspectives on dimensions for each recommendation. Dimension ratings
    were averaged across the five dimensions and used as an indication
    of overall merit for each recommendation. Differences were explored
    across dimensions, between care-oriented and prevention-oriented
    recommendations, and between stakeholder groups.RESULTS:Both care
    and prevention recommendations were rated highly overall, with median
    ratings well above the scale midpoint. In general, informed consent
    recommendations were most positively rated. Care-related recommendations
    were rated significantly more positively than prevention-related
    recommendations, with the five lowest-rated recommendations being
    prevention-related. The most problematic dimension across all recommendations
    was "Ease of Implementing," and the least problematic was "Agreement
    with," suggesting the most pressing stakeholder concerns are practical
    rather than theoretical; that is, respondents agree with but see
    barriers to the attainment of these recommendations.CONCLUSIONS:We
    propose that prevention recommendations be prioritized for refinement,
    especially those assigned bottom-ranking scores for "Ease of Implementing",
    and/ or "Ease of Understanding" in order to assist vaccine stakeholders
    to better comprehend and implement these recommendations. Further
    qualitative research could also assist to better understand nuances
    in stakeholder reservations about implementing such recommendations.},
    doi = {10.1186/1472-6939-15-51},
    file = {:Moorehouse2014_as_published.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {psycho},
    timestamp = {2014.08.15},
    url = {http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.790.152&rep=rep1&type=pdf},
    }

  • M. Quayle and M. Greer, “Mapping the state of the field of social psychology in africa and patterns of collaboration between african and international social psychologists,” International journal of psychology, vol. 49, iss. 6, p. 498–502, 2014. doi:10.1002/ijop.12059
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Patterns of collaboration in social psychology from 2000 to 2010 were mapped to analyse the position of African authors in the international co-authorship network using bibliographic records from the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge. There are very few social psychologists working in Africa, with the majority of these located in South Africa. Indeed, some small European countries boast more social psychologists than the entire continent of Africa. African authors published less than their non-African collaborators, but had comparable status on joint publications. Co-authorship relationships between African researchers from different African countries were generally mediated by partners from other continents, and direct collaboration between non-compatriot African authors was very rare. The small size, and extremely sparse connection of the African co-authorship network, is likely to be an obstacle both in the development of social psychology as a universally relevant discipline and in the penetration of social psychological knowledge in Africa.

    @Article{Quayle2014a,
    author = {Quayle, Michael and Greer, Megan},
    title = {Mapping the state of the field of social psychology in Africa and patterns of collaboration between African and international social psychologists},
    journal = {International Journal of Psychology},
    year = {2014},
    volume = {49},
    number = {6},
    pages = {498–502},
    issn = {1464-066X},
    abstract = {Patterns of collaboration in social psychology from 2000 to 2010 were
    mapped to analyse the position of African authors in the international
    co-authorship network using bibliographic records from the Thomson
    Reuters Web of Knowledge. There are very few social psychologists
    working in Africa, with the majority of these located in South Africa.
    Indeed, some small European countries boast more social psychologists
    than the entire continent of Africa. African authors published less
    than their non-African collaborators, but had comparable status on
    joint publications. Co-authorship relationships between African researchers
    from different African countries were generally mediated by partners
    from other continents, and direct collaboration between non-compatriot
    African authors was very rare. The small size, and extremely sparse
    connection of the African co-authorship network, is likely to be
    an obstacle both in the development of social psychology as a universally
    relevant discipline and in the penetration of social psychological
    knowledge in Africa.},
    doi = {10.1002/ijop.12059},
    file = {:Quayle&Greer2014_OnlineFirstVersion_10.1002-ijop.12059.pdf:PDF;:Quayle&Greer2014_FinalAcceptedVersion.pdf:PDF;:Quayle&Greer2014_FinalAcceptedVersion.docx:Word 2007+;:Quayle2014_CopyrightAgreement_International Journal of Psychology.docx:Word 2007+},
    keywords = {Bibliometric analysis, Social psychology, African collaboration, African scholarship, Indigenous knowledge production},
    owner = {psycho},
    publisher = {John Wiley \& Sons, Ltd},
    timestamp = {2014.08.15},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Quayle%26Greer2014_Prepub_final.pdf},
    }

2013

  • N. Munro, M. Quayle, H. Simpson, and S. Barnsley, “Hunger for knowledge: food insecurity among students at the university of kwazulu-natal,” Perspectives in education, vol. 31, iss. 4, pp. 168-179, 2013.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Article{Munro2013,
    author = {Nicholas Munro and Michael Quayle and Heather Simpson and Shelley Barnsley},
    title = {Hunger for knowledge: Food insecurity among students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal},
    journal = {Perspectives in Education},
    year = {2013},
    volume = {31},
    number = {4},
    pages = {168-179},
    file = {:Munro2013_PerspectivesInEducation.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {psycho},
    timestamp = {2013.12.17},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Nicholas_Munro/publication/277291353_Hunger_for_knowledge_Food_insecurity_among_students_at_the_University_of_KwaZulu-Natal/links/55dc0fc608aed6a199ac733b/Hunger-for-knowledge-Food-insecurity-among-students-at-the-University-of-KwaZulu-Natal.pdf},
    }

2012

  • M. Quayle and E. Naidoo, “Social risk and attribution: how considering the social risk of attributions can improve the performance of kelley’s anova model in applied research,” Journal of applied social psychology, vol. 42, iss. 7, p. 1694–1715, 2012. doi:10.1111/j.1559-1816.2012.00915.x
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Classic models of attribution are increasingly used, despite serious problems with their empirical validation. This study revisits Kelley’s (1967) ANOVA model of attribution and argues that it will most usefully predict attributions when attributional processes are socially “safeâ€? and have few social consequences. The results demonstrate that attributions are most likely to be inconsistent with Kelley’s predictions when attributional information and the attributions themselves are socially consequential or risky, but are more likely to be made as predicted when they are socially safe. Applications of Kelley’s model, therefore, should pay attention to the extent to which attributions and attributional information are socially consequential or risky, particularly when analyzing the use of consensus information.

    @Article{Quayle2012,
    author = {Quayle, Michael and Naidoo, Evasen},
    title = {Social Risk and Attribution: How Considering the Social Risk of Attributions Can Improve the Performance of Kelley's ANOVA Model in Applied Research},
    journal = {Journal of Applied Social Psychology},
    year = {2012},
    volume = {42},
    number = {7},
    pages = {1694–1715},
    issn = {1559-1816},
    abstract = {Classic models of attribution are increasingly used, despite serious
    problems with their empirical validation. This study revisits Kelley's
    (1967) ANOVA model of attribution and argues that it will most usefully
    predict attributions when attributional processes are socially “safe�
    and have few social consequences. The results demonstrate that attributions
    are most likely to be inconsistent with Kelley's predictions when
    attributional information and the attributions themselves are socially
    consequential or risky, but are more likely to be made as predicted
    when they are socially safe. Applications of Kelley's model, therefore,
    should pay attention to the extent to which attributions and attributional
    information are socially consequential or risky, particularly when
    analyzing the use of consensus information.},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1559-1816.2012.00915.x},
    file = {:Quayle2012InPress.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {QuayleM},
    publisher = {Blackwell Publishing Inc},
    timestamp = {2012.04.26},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Quayle%26Naidoo_jasp_attribution_final_prepub.pdf},
    }

  • C. Verwey and M. Quayle, “Whiteness, racism, and afrikaner identity in post-apartheid south africa,” African affairs, vol. 111, iss. 445, pp. 551-575, 2012.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article explores the production of post-apartheid Afrikaner identity in South Africa. Centred around the private sphere of the braai, the article draws on discursive psychology to investigate the participants’ dilemmas and struggles over their identity as Afrikaners, South Africans, and Africans, and the ways in which these identities are being redefined. The ‘backstage’ talk that is usually reserved for fellow whites or Afrikaners illustrates a clear difference between public and private constructions of Afrikaner identity. While the participants rejected many stereotypes of Afrikaner identity, they simultaneously recycled key discourses underlying apartheid ideology, particularly discourses of black incompetence and whites under threat. Participants generally claimed status as "Africans" but strongly resisted assimilation with "Africa" or a broader African identity. The article concludes that the construction of the Afrikaner community as embattled and systematically oppressed might provide powerful support for extremism.

    @Article{Verwey2012,
    author = {Verwey, Cornel and Quayle, Michael},
    title = {Whiteness, racism, and Afrikaner identity in post-apartheid South Africa},
    journal = {African Affairs},
    year = {2012},
    volume = {111},
    number = {445},
    pages = {551--575},
    month = oct,
    abstract = {This article explores the production of post-apartheid Afrikaner identity
    in South Africa. Centred around the private sphere of the braai,
    the article draws on discursive psychology to investigate the participants'
    dilemmas and struggles over their identity as Afrikaners, South Africans,
    and Africans, and the ways in which these identities are being redefined.
    The ‘backstage’ talk that is usually reserved for fellow whites
    or Afrikaners illustrates a clear difference between public and private
    constructions of Afrikaner identity. While the participants rejected
    many stereotypes of Afrikaner identity, they simultaneously recycled
    key discourses underlying apartheid ideology, particularly discourses
    of black incompetence and whites under threat. Participants generally
    claimed status as "Africans" but strongly resisted assimilation with
    "Africa" or a broader African identity. The article concludes that
    the construction of the Afrikaner community as embattled and systematically
    oppressed might provide powerful support for extremism.},
    comment = {10.1093/afraf/ads056},
    file = {:Verwey&Quayle2012_AfricanAffairs_FinalPublishedVersion.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    timestamp = {2015.06.25},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/270777863_Whiteness_racism_and_Afrikaner_identity_in_post-apartheid_South_Africa/links/56e9237a08ae9bcb3e1e4ae1.pdf},
    }

2011

  • M. {du Toit} and M. Quayle, “Multiracial families and contact theory in south africa : does direct and extended contact facilitated by multiracial families predict reduced prejudice?,” South african journal of psychology, vol. 41, iss. 4, pp. 540-551, 2011. doi:10.1177/008124631104100412
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Contact theory holds that increased contact between members of different groups can improve intergroup attitudes and reduce prejudice if it meets certain quality criteria, such as equal status, common goals, and cooperation within the contact situation. It is now emerging that even extended contact, or the mere knowledge that an ingroup member has a close relationship with an outgroup member, can lead to more positive intergroup attitudes. However, in South African society optimal contact is uncommon because most social spaces and structures are governed by strong norms of microsegregation that ensure that genuine optimal contact is uncommon. Given that multiracial families exemplify most features of optimal contact while radically challenging social norms of segregation, they may be important nodes for effective prejudice-reducing contact in South African society. This exploratory study investigated the extent to which general contact with people of other races, direct contact with multiracial families (i.e. personally knowing a member of a multiracial family), and extended contact with multiracial families (i.e. knowing someone who knows a member of a multiracial family) predicted reduced prejudice, reconciliatory race-policy attitudes and reduced intergroup threat. The results show that all three forms of contact predicted significantly reduced prejudice and that direct contact with multiracial families significantly predicted reduced prejudice over and above the effect of general interracial contact. Therefore we argue that contact researchers should consider more carefully whether normatively supported contact or radically norm-violating forms of contact optimally disrupt practices of microsegregation. Additionally, we argue that multiracial romantic relationships and families deserve increased attention and support as important nodes of prejudice reduction in South African society. However, general contact was also associated with reduced support for race-based social policies which supports the argument that the prejudice-reducing effects of interracial contact may be at least partially offset by other effects that may hinder broader social change.

    @Article{duToit2011,
    author = {{du Toit}, M. and Quayle, M.},
    title = {Multiracial families and contact theory in South Africa : does direct and extended contact facilitated by multiracial families predict reduced prejudice?},
    journal = {South African Journal of Psychology},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {41},
    number = {4},
    pages = {540-551},
    abstract = {Contact theory holds that increased contact between members of different
    groups can improve intergroup attitudes and reduce prejudice if it
    meets certain quality criteria, such as equal status, common goals,
    and cooperation within the contact situation. It is now emerging
    that even extended contact, or the mere knowledge that an ingroup
    member has a close relationship with an outgroup member, can lead
    to more positive intergroup attitudes. However, in South African
    society optimal contact is uncommon because most social spaces and
    structures are governed by strong norms of microsegregation that
    ensure that genuine optimal contact is uncommon. Given that multiracial
    families exemplify most features of optimal contact while radically
    challenging social norms of segregation, they may be important nodes
    for effective prejudice-reducing contact in South African society.
    This exploratory study investigated the extent to which general contact
    with people of other races, direct contact with multiracial families
    (i.e. personally knowing a member of a multiracial family), and extended
    contact with multiracial families (i.e. knowing someone who knows
    a member of a multiracial family) predicted reduced prejudice, reconciliatory
    race-policy attitudes and reduced intergroup threat. The results
    show that all three forms of contact predicted significantly reduced
    prejudice and that direct contact with multiracial families significantly
    predicted reduced prejudice over and above the effect of general
    interracial contact. Therefore we argue that contact researchers
    should consider more carefully whether normatively supported contact
    or radically norm-violating forms of contact optimally disrupt practices
    of microsegregation. Additionally, we argue that multiracial romantic
    relationships and families deserve increased attention and support
    as important nodes of prejudice reduction in South African society.
    However, general contact was also associated with reduced support
    for race-based social policies which supports the argument that the
    prejudice-reducing effects of interracial contact may be at least
    partially offset by other effects that may hinder broader social
    change.},
    doi = {10.1177/008124631104100412},
    file = {:duToit2011_FinalPublished.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {psycho},
    timestamp = {2011.12.12},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/duToit%26Quayle2011_preprintproofs.pdf},
    }

  • M. Quayle, “Situated identity performance: understanding stereotype threat as a social identity phenomenon,” PhD Thesis, 2011.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Stereotype threat or boost (STB) is a situational modifier of task performance that occurs when a group stereotype becomes relevant to the performance of a stereotype relevant task. This dissertation aimed to re-imagine STB in light of social identity theory. Ten studies were undertaken that each manipulated status and either identifiability, conflict or permeability and explored the effects on the performance of the Ravens Advanced Progressive Matrices. Additional identity and socio-structural constructs were also measured and explored, including stability, legitimacy and ingroup identification. The results showed that STB is not simply “activated” or “deactivated” when stereotypes become relevant to task performance. On the contrary, the specific features of identity, the contextual features of the social environment in which the identity performance takes place, and the performer’s strategic engagement with their identity resources and liabilities are important features of how STB impacts on performance, and how it is sometimes resisted and overturned by experimental subjects. Indeed, performance was generally not predictable on the basis of stereotype activation until resistance to the negative or positive status manipulations were also accounted for. Although the STB literature is tightly focused on the case of negative stereotypes undermining performance, incongruent effects in which negative stereotypes enhance performance and positive stereotypes undermine it have also been reported. In the present studies incongruent STB effects were frequently observed. Underperformance in boost conditions was most consistently predicted by perceived intergroup conflict, while enhanced performance under threat was consistently predicted by perceived group boundary permeability. Additionally, underperformance in boost conditions was often a result of ‘slipstreaming’ rather than ‘choking under pressure,’ since participants were evidently counting on their generally secure identity in the experimental context to buffer poor performance on the experimental task. Improved performance in threat conditions was most likely when participants perceived themselves to be representatives of their group and when they believed that their improved performance would make a difference for their own reputation or the reputation of their group. These findings challenge the common image of the passive subject in the STB literature and, instead, suggest that STB effects are an outcome of situated identity performance. This model of STB effects understands task-performance in a specific performance context as an active and strategic expression of situated identity oriented not only to the social features of the performance context (as argued by most SIT theorists), but also to the their own reading of that context, their total identity liabilities and resources (including individual ability and alternative identities) and their strategic motivations in the context.

    @PhdThesis{Quayle2011,
    author = {Michael Quayle},
    title = {Situated identity performance: Understanding stereotype threat as a social identity phenomenon},
    school = {School of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal},
    year = {2011},
    abstract = {Stereotype threat or boost (STB) is a situational modifier of task
    performance that occurs when a group stereotype becomes relevant
    to the performance of a stereotype relevant task. This dissertation
    aimed to re-imagine STB in light of social identity theory. Ten studies
    were undertaken that each manipulated status and either identifiability,
    conflict or permeability and explored the effects on the performance
    of the Ravens Advanced Progressive Matrices. Additional identity
    and socio-structural constructs were also measured and explored,
    including stability, legitimacy and ingroup identification. The results
    showed that STB is not simply “activated” or “deactivated” when stereotypes
    become relevant to task performance. On the contrary, the specific
    features of identity, the contextual features of the social environment
    in which the identity performance takes place, and the performer’s
    strategic engagement with their identity resources and liabilities
    are important features of how STB impacts on performance, and how
    it is sometimes resisted and overturned by experimental subjects.
    Indeed, performance was generally not predictable on the basis of
    stereotype activation until resistance to the negative or positive
    status manipulations were also accounted for. Although the STB literature
    is tightly focused on the case of negative stereotypes undermining
    performance, incongruent effects in which negative stereotypes enhance
    performance and positive stereotypes undermine it have also been
    reported. In the present studies incongruent STB effects were frequently
    observed. Underperformance in boost conditions was most consistently
    predicted by perceived intergroup conflict, while enhanced performance
    under threat was consistently predicted by perceived group boundary
    permeability. Additionally, underperformance in boost conditions
    was often a result of ‘slipstreaming’ rather than ‘choking under
    pressure,’ since participants were evidently counting on their generally
    secure identity in the experimental context to buffer poor performance
    on the experimental task. Improved performance in threat conditions
    was most likely when participants perceived themselves to be representatives
    of their group and when they believed that their improved performance
    would make a difference for their own reputation or the reputation
    of their group. These findings challenge the common image of the
    passive subject in the STB literature and, instead, suggest that
    STB effects are an outcome of situated identity performance. This
    model of STB effects understands task-performance in a specific performance
    context as an active and strategic expression of situated identity
    oriented not only to the social features of the performance context
    (as argued by most SIT theorists), but also to the their own reading
    of that context, their total identity liabilities and resources (including
    individual ability and alternative identities) and their strategic
    motivations in the context.},
    file = {Quayle2011_PhD.pdf:Quayle2011_PhD.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {User},
    timestamp = {2011.11.21},
    url = {https://researchspace.ukzn.ac.za/handle/10413/5011},
    }

2010

  • J. Dixon, K. Durrheim, C. G. Tredoux, L. R. Tropp, B. Clack, L. Eaton, and M. Quayle, “Challenging the stubborn core of opposition to equality: racial contact and policy attitudes,” Political psychology, vol. 31, iss. 6, pp. 831-855, 2010. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9221.2010.00792.x
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A Random Digit Dialing survey (n = 794) examined the interracial contact experiences and racial attitudes of White South Africans. The survey measured racial attitudes not only in terms of individuals’ prejudice, but also in terms of their perceptions of group threat, perceived injustice, and support for various government policies designed to rectify the legacy of apartheid. The results indicated that the frequency and quality of interracial contact predicted Whites’ support for both race compensatory and race preferential policies of redress, and these effects were partly mediated by perceived threat, sense of fairness, and racial prejudice. The research points to a potential rapprochement between the social psychological theories of intergroup contact and group positioning theories derived from the work of Blumer. It also highlights the value of adopting a more expansive and politically nuanced conception of the “consequencesâ€� of contact and desegregation.

    @Article{Dixon2010,
    author = {Dixon, John and Durrheim, Kevin and Tredoux, Colin G. and Tropp, Linda R. and Clack, Beverley and Eaton, Liberty and Quayle, Michael},
    title = {Challenging the Stubborn Core of Opposition to Equality: Racial Contact and Policy Attitudes},
    journal = {Political Psychology},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {31},
    number = {6},
    pages = {831--855},
    month = dec,
    issn = {1467-9221},
    abstract = {A Random Digit Dialing survey (n = 794) examined the interracial
    contact experiences and racial attitudes of White South Africans.
    The survey measured racial attitudes not only in terms of individuals'
    prejudice, but also in terms of their perceptions of group threat,
    perceived injustice, and support for various government policies
    designed to rectify the legacy of apartheid. The results indicated
    that the frequency and quality of interracial contact predicted Whites'
    support for both race compensatory and race preferential policies
    of redress, and these effects were partly mediated by perceived threat,
    sense of fairness, and racial prejudice. The research points to a
    potential rapprochement between the social psychological theories
    of intergroup contact and group positioning theories derived from
    the work of Blumer. It also highlights the value of adopting a more
    expansive and politically nuanced conception of the “consequences�
    of contact and desegregation.},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9221.2010.00792.x},
    keywords = {Prejudice, Contact hypothesis, Policy attitudes, South Africa},
    owner = {psycho},
    publisher = {Blackwell Publishing Inc},
    timestamp = {2016.03.12},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/230442981_Challenging_the_Stubborn_Core_of_Opposition_to_Equality_Racial_Contact_and_Policy_Attitudes/links/583feafe08aeda69680ce623/Challenging-the-Stubborn-Core-of-Opposition-to-Equality-Racial-Contact-and-Policy-Attitudes.pdf},
    }

  • Z. Essack, J. Koen, N. Barsdorf, C. Slack, M. Quayle, C. Milford, G. Lindegger, C. Ranchod, and R. Mukuka, “Stakeholder perspectives on ethical challenges in hiv vaccine trials in south africa,” Developing world bioethics, vol. 10, iss. 1, pp. 11-21, 2010. doi:10.1111/j.1471-8847.2009.00254.x
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    There is little published literature on the ethical concerns of stakeholders in HIV vaccine trials. This study explored the ethical challenges identified by various stakeholders, through an open-ended, in-depth approach. While the few previous studies have been largely quantitative, respondents in this study had the opportunity to spontaneously identify the issues that they perceived to be of priority concern in the South African context. Stakeholders spontaneously identified the following as ethical priorities: informed consent, social harms, collaborative relationships between research stakeholders, the participation of children and adolescents, access to treatment for participants who become infected with HIV, physical harms, fair participant and community selection, confidentiality, benefits, and payment. While there is some speculation that research in developing countries poses special ethical challenges, overall no issues were identified that have not been anticipated in international guidance, literature and popular frameworks. However, the South African context affords a distinctive gloss to these expected issues; for example, respondents were concerned that the predominant selection of black participants may perpetuate racist practices of apartheid. Stakeholders should be aware of contextual factors impacting on the implementation of ethical principles. We make a series of recommendations for South African trials, including amendments to the ethical-legal framework and research policies, and, for further research.

    @Article{ESSACK2010,
    author = {Essack, Zaynab And Koen, Jennifer And Barsdorf, Nicola And Slack, Catherine And Quayle, Michael And Milford, Cecilia And Lindegger, Graham And Ranchod, Chitra And Mukuka, Richard},
    title = {Stakeholder perspectives on ethical challenges in HIV vaccine trials in South Africa},
    journal = {Developing World Bioethics},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {10},
    number = {1},
    pages = {11--21},
    abstract = {There is little published literature on the ethical concerns of stakeholders
    in HIV vaccine trials. This study explored the ethical challenges
    identified by various stakeholders, through an open-ended, in-depth
    approach. While the few previous studies have been largely quantitative,
    respondents in this study had the opportunity to spontaneously identify
    the issues that they perceived to be of priority concern in the South
    African context. Stakeholders spontaneously identified the following
    as ethical priorities: informed consent, social harms, collaborative
    relationships between research stakeholders, the participation of
    children and adolescents, access to treatment for participants who
    become infected with HIV, physical harms, fair participant and community
    selection, confidentiality, benefits, and payment. While there is
    some speculation that research in developing countries poses special
    ethical challenges, overall no issues were identified that have not
    been anticipated in international guidance, literature and popular
    frameworks. However, the South African context affords a distinctive
    gloss to these expected issues; for example, respondents were concerned
    that the predominant selection of black participants may perpetuate
    racist practices of apartheid. Stakeholders should be aware of contextual
    factors impacting on the implementation of ethical principles. We
    make a series of recommendations for South African trials, including
    amendments to the ethical-legal framework and research policies,
    and, for further research.},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1471-8847.2009.00254.x},
    owner = {ADMIN},
    timestamp = {2010.04.27},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Catherine_Slack/publication/24444063_Stakeholder_perspectives_on_ethical_challenges_in_HIV_vaccine_trials_in_South_Africa/links/5516931f0cf2b5d6a0ee92bd.pdf},
    }

  • K. Talbot and M. Quayle, “The perils of being a nice guy: contextual variation in five young women’s constructions of acceptable hegemonic and alternative masculinities,” Men and masculinities, vol. 13, iss. 2, pp. 255-278, 2010. doi:10.1177/1097184X09350408
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Masculinity is often studied as produced and enacted by men, unintentionally positioning women as mere consumers of masculinity, rather than active agents in its construction. This study explored five young South African women’s constructions of masculinity in the contexts of work, friendships, family, and romantic relationships and the contextual variation of acceptable masculinity across contexts. While they advocated nonhegemonic ‘‘nice guy’’ masculinities in social and work contexts, they appealed strongly to ‘‘hegemonic’’ or traditional masculine ideals in romantic and family contexts. It seems that these women were particularly willing to accept subjugation to engage in ideals of romantic partnership congruent with emphasized femininity. This study demonstrates that (1) contextual variation is a very important feature in the production of hegemonic masculinity and (2) analyzing masculinity from women’s perspectives may provide valuable insight into the contribution that women make to the construction and maintenance of counterfeminist masculine ideals and identity frameworks.

    @Article{Talbot2010,
    author = {Talbot, Kirsten and Quayle, Michael},
    title = {The Perils of Being a Nice Guy: Contextual Variation in Five Young Women's Constructions of Acceptable Hegemonic and Alternative Masculinities},
    journal = {Men and Masculinities},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {13},
    number = {2},
    pages = {255-278},
    abstract = {Masculinity is often studied as produced and enacted by men, unintentionally
    positioning women as mere consumers of masculinity, rather than active
    agents in its construction. This study explored five young South
    African women’s constructions of masculinity in the contexts of
    work, friendships, family, and romantic relationships and the contextual
    variation of acceptable masculinity across contexts. While they advocated
    nonhegemonic ‘‘nice guy’’ masculinities in social and work
    contexts, they appealed strongly to ‘‘hegemonic’’ or traditional
    masculine ideals in romantic and family contexts. It seems that these
    women were particularly willing to accept subjugation to engage in
    ideals of romantic partnership congruent with emphasized femininity.
    This study demonstrates that (1) contextual variation is a very important
    feature in the production of hegemonic masculinity and (2) analyzing
    masculinity from women’s perspectives may provide valuable insight
    into the contribution that women make to the construction and maintenance
    of counterfeminist masculine ideals and identity frameworks.},
    doi = {10.1177/1097184X09350408},
    eprint = {http://jmm.sagepub.com/content/13/2/255.full.pdf+html},
    file = {:Talbot & Quayle 2010 - Men & Masculinities Final published version.pdf:PDF},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/249697584_The_Perils_of_Being_a_Nice_Guy_Contextual_Variation_in_Five_Young_Women's_Constructions_of_Acceptable_Hegemonic_and_Alternative_Masculinities/links/0deec523ac98507c0f000000.pdf},
    }

2009

  • K. Durrheim, J. Dixon, C. Tredoux, L. Eaton, M. Quayle, and B. Clack, “Predicting support for racial transformation policies: intergroup threat, racial prejudice, sense of group entitlement and strength of identification,” European journal of social psychology, vol. 41, iss. 1, pp. 23-41, 2009. doi:10.1002/ejsp.723
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Policies and programs designed to challenge the effects of racial discrimination (such as affirmative action) are hotly contested. Factors which have been proposed to explain opposition to these policies include racial prejudice, group threat and self-interest, and perceptions of intergroup justice. We report the results of two random national telephone surveys which tested a theoretically based model of the predictors of policy support in post-apartheid South Africa. The results provided limited support for Blumer’s group position model. Compensatory and preferential treatment policies had different underlying predictors: Violated entitlement featured in the models of compensatory policy attitudes, but not preferential treatment policy attitudes, where threat was the strongest predictor. In addition to threat and violated entitlement, policy attitudes among the black sample were related to ingroup identification but those of the white sample were related to prejudice. The effects of these variables were in the opposite directions for the two samples: Policy support was associated with strong ingroup identification and high levels of threat among the black sample (i.e. prospective beneficiaries of the transformation policies), but with low levels of prejudice and threat among the white sample. We conclude by considering the implications that these findings have for social change programs. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    @Article{Durrheim2009,
    author = {Durrheim, Kevin and Dixon, John and Tredoux, Colin and Eaton, Liberty and Quayle, Michael and Clack, Beverley},
    title = {Predicting support for racial transformation policies: Intergroup threat, racial prejudice, sense of group entitlement and strength of identification},
    journal = {European Journal of Social Psychology},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {41},
    number = {1},
    pages = {23-41},
    abstract = {Policies and programs designed to challenge the effects of racial
    discrimination (such as affirmative action) are hotly contested.
    Factors which have been proposed to explain opposition to these policies
    include racial prejudice, group threat and self-interest, and perceptions
    of intergroup justice. We report the results of two random national
    telephone surveys which tested a theoretically based model of the
    predictors of policy support in post-apartheid South Africa. The
    results provided limited support for Blumer's group position model.
    Compensatory and preferential treatment policies had different underlying
    predictors: Violated entitlement featured in the models of compensatory
    policy attitudes, but not preferential treatment policy attitudes,
    where threat was the strongest predictor. In addition to threat and
    violated entitlement, policy attitudes among the black sample were
    related to ingroup identification but those of the white sample were
    related to prejudice. The effects of these variables were in the
    opposite directions for the two samples: Policy support was associated
    with strong ingroup identification and high levels of threat among
    the black sample (i.e. prospective beneficiaries of the transformation
    policies), but with low levels of prejudice and threat among the
    white sample. We conclude by considering the implications that these
    findings have for social change programs. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley
    & Sons, Ltd.},
    doi = {10.1002/ejsp.723},
    file = {Durrheim2009.pdf:Durrheim2009.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {ADMIN},
    timestamp = {2010.04.27},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kevin_Durrheim/publication/227666412_Predicting_support_for_racial_transformation_policies_Intergroup_threat_racial_prejudice_sense_of_group_entitlement_and_strength_of_identification/links/02bfe513888f31ac6b000000.pdf},
    }

  • G. Lindegger and M. Quayle, “Hiv/aids in south africa 25 years on,” , P. Rohleder, L. Swartz, S. C. Kalichman, and L. C. Simbayi, Eds., New York: Springer, 2009, pp. 41-54.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @InBook{Lindegger2009,
    chapter = {Masculinity and HIV/AIDS},
    pages = {41-54},
    title = {HIV/AIDS in South Africa 25 years on},
    publisher = {New York: Springer},
    year = {2009},
    author = {Graham Lindegger and Michael Quayle},
    editor = {Poul Rohleder and Leslie Swartz and Seth C. Kalichman and Leickness Chisamu Simbayi},
    file = {:Lindegger&Quayle_in_Rohleder_et_al_ch4.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {QuayleM},
    timestamp = {2012.07.06},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Lindegger%26Quayle2009_in_Rohleder_et_al_ch4.pdf},
    }

2008

  • M. Quayle and K. Durrheim, “Producing expertise and achieving attribution in the context of computer support,” British journal of social psychology, vol. 47, iss. 4, pp. 727-762, 2008. doi:10.1348/014466607X256751
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study uses transcripts of interactions recorded between computer technicians and users to investigate the activities related to attribution and problem solving in the context of institutional computer support. We explore how achieving consensual attributions (in the context of diagnosis) is integral to managing moment-to-moment social demands, and how the outcomes are subject to negotiations about the definition of the problem and the nature of the social contract between interactants. We also show that these immediate interactional interests are subject to the longer-term ‘moral careers’ of the participants which are themselves subject to the roles, obligations, and concerns that participants have by virtue of their social and institutional positions. These immediate and longer-term layers of concern are interrelated and contingent, and all are important elements of how consensual attributions are socially accomplished in this context.

    @Article{Quayle2008,
    author = {Quayle, Michael and Durrheim, Kevin},
    title = {Producing expertise and achieving attribution in the context of computer support},
    journal = {British Journal of Social Psychology},
    year = {2008},
    volume = {47},
    number = {4},
    pages = {727--762},
    issn = {2044-8309},
    abstract = {This study uses transcripts of interactions recorded between computer
    technicians and users to investigate the activities related to attribution
    and problem solving in the context of institutional computer support.
    We explore how achieving consensual attributions (in the context
    of diagnosis) is integral to managing moment-to-moment social demands,
    and how the outcomes are subject to negotiations about the definition
    of the problem and the nature of the social contract between interactants.
    We also show that these immediate interactional interests are subject
    to the longer-term ‘moral careers’ of the participants which are
    themselves subject to the roles, obligations, and concerns that participants
    have by virtue of their social and institutional positions. These
    immediate and longer-term layers of concern are interrelated and
    contingent, and all are important elements of how consensual attributions
    are socially accomplished in this context.},
    doi = {10.1348/014466607X256751},
    file = {:Quayle&Durrheim2009-BJSP-ProducingExpertise&AchievingAttribution_FinalCorrectedMS.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {ADMIN},
    publisher = {Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
    timestamp = {2011.06.22},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Quayle%26Durrheim2009-BJSP-ProducingExpertise%26AchievingAttribution_FinalCorrectedMS.pdf},
    }

2007

  • G. Lindegger, M. Quayle, and M. Ndlovu, “Local knowledge and experiences of vaccination: implications for hiv-preventive vaccine trials in south africa,” Health education and behavior, vol. 34, iss. 1, pp. 108-123, 2007. doi:DOI: 10.1177/1090198105277852
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @Article{Lindegger2007,
    author = {Graham Lindegger and Michael Quayle and Moses Ndlovu},
    title = {Local Knowledge and Experiences of Vaccination: Implications for HIV-Preventive Vaccine Trials in South Africa},
    journal = {Health Education and Behavior},
    year = {2007},
    volume = {34},
    number = {1},
    pages = {108-123},
    doi = {DOI: 10.1177/1090198105277852},
    file = {Lindegger2007.pdf:Lindegger2007.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {psycho},
    timestamp = {2014.02.23},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/7041479_Local_Knowledge_and_Experiences_of_Vaccination_Implications_for_HIV-Preventive_Vaccine_Trials_in_South_Africa/links/00b7d537b506cf0207000000.pdf},
    }

  • Z. Essack and M. Quayle, “Students’ perceptions of a university access (bridging) programme for social science, commerce and humanities : research article,” Perspectives in education, vol. 25, iss. 1, pp. 71-84, 2007.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    <p>Universities in South Africa face the challenge of redressing past (and continuing) inequalities in higher education by increasing accessibility to previously (and currently) disadvantaged students. One means of doing so is through &apos;access&apos; or &apos;bridging&apos; programmes. This article explores successful students&apos; perceptions of one such programme at the University of KwaZulu- Natal by means of qualitative focus group interviews. This retrospective evaluation of the programme explores students&apos; perspectives on the extent to which the Access Programme (AP) has &apos;bridged the gap&apos; between secondary and tertiary education as well as any potential negative outcomes generated by the programme, e.g. perceptions of stigma. Results indicate that (1) interviewed students generally perceived the programme as beneficial and legitimate in preparing them for their degree studies, (2) the racial homogeneity and the isolation of AP students from mainstream students have resulted in some negative outcomes such as perceptions of stigmatisation and inferiority and (3) students enrolled in the programme and the programme management may have quite different perceptions of the nature of the &apos;articulation gap&apos; that the programme aims to address.</p>

    @Article{Essack2007,
    author = {Essack, Zaynab and Quayle, Michael},
    title = {Students' perceptions of a university access (bridging) programme for social science, commerce and humanities : research article},
    journal = {Perspectives in Education},
    year = {2007},
    volume = {25},
    number = {1},
    pages = {71-84},
    issn = {0258-2236},
    abstract = {<p>Universities in South Africa face the challenge of redressing past (and continuing) inequalities in higher education by increasing accessibility to previously (and currently) disadvantaged students. One means of doing so is through &apos;access&apos; or &apos;bridging&apos; programmes. This article explores successful students&apos; perceptions of one such programme at the University of KwaZulu- Natal by means of qualitative focus group interviews. This retrospective evaluation of the programme explores students&apos; perspectives on the extent to which the Access Programme (AP) has &apos;bridged the gap&apos; between secondary and tertiary education as well as any potential negative outcomes generated by the programme, e.g. perceptions of stigma. Results indicate that (1) interviewed students generally perceived the programme as beneficial and legitimate in preparing them for their degree studies, (2) the racial homogeneity and the isolation of AP students from mainstream students have resulted in some negative outcomes such as perceptions of stigmatisation and inferiority and (3) students enrolled in the programme and the programme management may have quite different perceptions of the nature of the &apos;articulation gap&apos; that the programme aims to address.</p>},
    comment = {https://journals.co.za/content/persed/25/1/EJC87416},
    language = {English},
    owner = {Mike.quayle},
    publicationname = {University of the Free State},
    timestamp = {2017.04.27},
    type = {Journal Article},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/269702729_Students%27_perceptions_or_a_university_access_bridging_programme_for_social_science_commerce_and_humanities/links/583feb5c08ae2d21755aac7f/Students-perceptions-or-a-university-access-bridging-programme-for-social-science-commerce-and-humanities.pdf},
    }

2006

  • G. Lindegger, C. Milford, C. Slack, M. Quayle, X. Xaba, and E. Vardas, “Beyond the checklist: assessing understanding for hiv vaccine trial participation in south africa,” Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes, vol. 43, iss. 5, pp. 560-566, 2006. doi:10.1097/01.qai.0000247225.37752.f5
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Objectives: Informed consent and understanding are essential ethical requirements for clinical trial participation. Traditional binary measures of understanding may be limited and not be the best measures of level of understanding. This study designed and compared 4 measures of understanding for potential participants being prepared for enrollment in South African HIV vaccine trials, using detailed operational scoring criteria. Methods: Assessment of understanding of 7 key trial components was compared via self-report, checklist, vignettes, and narrative measures. Fifty-nine participants, including members of vaccine preparedness groups and 1 HIV vaccine trial, took part. Results: There were significant differences across the measures for understanding of 5 components and for overall understanding. Highest scores were obtained on self-report and checklist measures, and lowest scores were obtained for vignettes and narrative descriptions. Conclusions: The findings suggest that levels of measured understanding are dependent on the tools used. Forced-choice measures like checklists tend to yield higher scores than open-ended measures like narratives or vignettes. Consideration should be given to complementing checklists and self-reports with open-ended measures, particularly for critical trial concepts, where the consequences of misunderstanding are potentially severe.

    @Article{Lindegger2006,
    author = {Lindegger, Graham and Milford, Cecilia and Slack, Catherine and Quayle, Michael and Xaba, Xolani and Vardas, Eftyhia},
    title = {Beyond the Checklist: Assessing Understanding for HIV Vaccine Trial Participation in South Africa},
    journal = {Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes},
    year = {2006},
    volume = {43},
    number = {5},
    pages = {560-566},
    issn = {1525-4135},
    abstract = {Objectives: Informed consent and understanding are essential ethical
    requirements for clinical trial participation. Traditional binary
    measures of understanding may be limited and not be the best measures
    of level of understanding. This study designed and compared 4 measures
    of understanding for potential participants being prepared for enrollment
    in South African HIV vaccine trials, using detailed operational scoring
    criteria. Methods: Assessment of understanding of 7 key trial components
    was compared via self-report, checklist, vignettes, and narrative
    measures. Fifty-nine participants, including members of vaccine preparedness
    groups and 1 HIV vaccine trial, took part. Results: There were significant
    differences across the measures for understanding of 5 components
    and for overall understanding. Highest scores were obtained on self-report
    and checklist measures, and lowest scores were obtained for vignettes
    and narrative descriptions. Conclusions: The findings suggest that
    levels of measured understanding are dependent on the tools used.
    Forced-choice measures like checklists tend to yield higher scores
    than open-ended measures like narratives or vignettes. Consideration
    should be given to complementing checklists and self-reports with
    open-ended measures, particularly for critical trial concepts, where
    the consequences of misunderstanding are potentially severe.},
    comment = {http://journals.lww.com/jaids/Fulltext/2006/12150/Beyond_the_Checklist__Assessing_Understanding_for.10.aspx},
    doi = {10.1097/01.qai.0000247225.37752.f5},
    file = {Lindegger2006.pdf:Lindegger2006.pdf:PDF},
    keywords = {understanding, consent, HIV vaccine trials, ethics},
    owner = {psycho},
    refid = {00126334-200612150-00010},
    timestamp = {2014.10.01},
    url = {http://michaelquayle.net/pubs/Lindegger2006_etal_BeyondTheCheckList.pdf},
    }

  • M. Quayle and K. Durrheim, “When the chips are down: social and technical aspects of computer failure and repair,” Interacting with computers, vol. 18, iss. 6, pp. 1260-1277, 2006. doi:DOI: 10.1016/j.intcom.2006.03.003
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This paper explores computer failure as a social event by examining recorded interactions between computer users and help-desk consultants (technicians). It was found, first, that the nature of a failure was negotiated between participants rather than being simply technically evident. Failure was defined from users’ perspectives, in relation to what they were trying to achieve, rather than according to technical parameters. Secondly, negotiations of failure had social consequences for both users and help-desk consultants. Both avoided being seen as incompetent and actively defended their social standing. Thirdly, such social issues sometimes took precedence over technical and practical ones. The implications for HCI theorists and practitioners are twofold: firstly, failure should be accepted as a regular part of computer use in which human-computer interaction continues even though the interface may be non-functional. Secondly, the management of failure could be better addressed if technicians were trained in social as well as technical intervention skills.

    @Article{Quayle2006,
    author = {Michael Quayle and Kevin Durrheim},
    title = {When the chips are down: Social and technical aspects of computer failure and repair},
    journal = {Interacting with Computers},
    year = {2006},
    volume = {18},
    number = {6},
    pages = {1260 - 1277},
    issn = {0953-5438},
    note = {Special Issue: Symbiotic Performance between Humans and Intelligent Systems},
    abstract = {This paper explores computer failure as a social event by examining
    recorded interactions between computer users and help-desk consultants
    (technicians). It was found, first, that the nature of a failure
    was negotiated between participants rather than being simply technically
    evident. Failure was defined from users' perspectives, in relation
    to what they were trying to achieve, rather than according to technical
    parameters. Secondly, negotiations of failure had social consequences
    for both users and help-desk consultants. Both avoided being seen
    as incompetent and actively defended their social standing. Thirdly,
    such social issues sometimes took precedence over technical and practical
    ones. The implications for HCI theorists and practitioners are twofold:
    firstly, failure should be accepted as a regular part of computer
    use in which human-computer interaction continues even though the
    interface may be non-functional. Secondly, the management of failure
    could be better addressed if technicians were trained in social as
    well as technical intervention skills.},
    doi = {DOI: 10.1016/j.intcom.2006.03.003},
    file = {:Quayle&Durrheim-INTCOM-Final.pdf:PDF},
    keywords = {HCI},
    owner = {ADMIN},
    timestamp = {2010.03.10},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/220055017_When_the_chips_are_down_Social_and_technical_aspects_of_computer_failure_and_repair/links/00463523ad3b613327000000.pdf},
    }

2005

  • K. Durrheim, M. Quayle, K. Whitehead, and A. Kriel, “Denying racism: discursive strategies used by the south african media,” Critical arts, vol. 19, iss. 1-2, pp. 167-186, 2005. doi:10.1080/02560040585310111
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Abstract In 1999 the South African media was the subject of a South African Human Rights Commission inquiry into racism. This article explores the discursive practices deployed by mainstream newspapers in response to these accusations of racism. It shows how several interlocking strategies of denial were used to remodel the field of racist practices and representations into a terrain suited to preserving white privilege. Specifically, the media used strategies of splitting, (dis)locating, relativising, trivialising, de-racialising and, ultimately, reversing racism. By constructing the terrain of racism in this way, the South African media were able to sidestep criticism by developing ?acceptable? arguments for reasonable prejudice that marginalise black experience. Abstract In 1999 the South African media was the subject of a South African Human Rights Commission inquiry into racism. This article explores the discursive practices deployed by mainstream newspapers in response to these accusations of racism. It shows how several interlocking strategies of denial were used to remodel the field of racist practices and representations into a terrain suited to preserving white privilege. Specifically, the media used strategies of splitting, (dis)locating, relativising, trivialising, de-racialising and, ultimately, reversing racism. By constructing the terrain of racism in this way, the South African media were able to sidestep criticism by developing ?acceptable? arguments for reasonable prejudice that marginalise black experience.

    @Article{Durrheim2005,
    author = {Durrheim, Kevin and Quayle, Michael and Whitehead, Kevin and Kriel, Anita},
    title = {Denying racism: Discursive strategies used by the South African media},
    journal = {Critical Arts},
    year = {2005},
    volume = {19},
    number = {1-2},
    pages = {167--186},
    month = jan,
    issn = {0256-0046},
    abstract = {Abstract In 1999 the South African media was the subject of a South
    African Human Rights Commission inquiry into racism. This article
    explores the discursive practices deployed by mainstream newspapers
    in response to these accusations of racism. It shows how several
    interlocking strategies of denial were used to remodel the field
    of racist practices and representations into a terrain suited to
    preserving white privilege. Specifically, the media used strategies
    of splitting, (dis)locating, relativising, trivialising, de-racialising
    and, ultimately, reversing racism. By constructing the terrain of
    racism in this way, the South African media were able to sidestep
    criticism by developing ?acceptable? arguments for reasonable prejudice
    that marginalise black experience. Abstract In 1999 the South African
    media was the subject of a South African Human Rights Commission
    inquiry into racism. This article explores the discursive practices
    deployed by mainstream newspapers in response to these accusations
    of racism. It shows how several interlocking strategies of denial
    were used to remodel the field of racist practices and representations
    into a terrain suited to preserving white privilege. Specifically,
    the media used strategies of splitting, (dis)locating, relativising,
    trivialising, de-racialising and, ultimately, reversing racism. By
    constructing the terrain of racism in this way, the South African
    media were able to sidestep criticism by developing ?acceptable?
    arguments for reasonable prejudice that marginalise black experience.},
    booktitle = {Critical Arts},
    comment = {doi: 10.1080/02560040585310111},
    doi = {10.1080/02560040585310111},
    file = {:DurrheimQuayleWhiteheadKriel2007RacismInMedia.pdf:PDF},
    owner = {mike.quayle},
    publisher = {Routledge},
    timestamp = {2013.09.19},
    url = {https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Quayle/publication/233224050_Denying_racism_Discursive_strategies_used_by_the_South_African_media/links/00b7d523ad70c568af000000/Denying-racism-Discursive-strategies-used-by-the-South-African-media.pdf},
    }